5 of the Biggest Resume Mistakes

The quickest way to eliminate yourself from a job process is by having mistakes on your resume. Beyond the obvious grammatical and spelling mistakes to avoid, there are 5 other BIG mistakes to be aware of and stay away from:

1) Not including keywords that match the job. Your resume must show that you are qualified for the job so include keywords on your resume to refer to the specific position. You have very little time to grab a hiring manager’s attention so don’t send a generic resume. You will be lost in the pile.

2) Focusing on the wrong thing. Candidates often explain their responsibilities but forget to include results. Set yourself apart from the pack by highlighting specific accomplishments. The more quantitative, the better. In fact, numbers and metrics speak louder than words.

3) Being too modest. Don’t forget to include any awards or recognition you’ve received such as “President’s Club Member” for being over quota by 25%. Also, include any community service awards you received. Hiring managers look favorably upon people who not only work hard at the office but make a difference in the community as well.

4) Leaving unanswered red flags. Candidates usually wait until the first interview before addressing any gaps that may be on their resume, but this can prove to be a mistake. Most candidates won’t make it to a first interview if the issues are not explained on their resume, cover letter or even LinkedIn profile. So if you moved around a lot in your career, it would be to your benefit to explain the reasons for your movement.

5) Writing too much. When writing your resume be as succinct and concise as possible. Keep your resume to 1 or 2 pages max. Bullet points and short paragraphs enhance readability. Limit your resume to the last 10 - 15 years of work experience. You don't need to include everything you ever did.

 

Top 5 Lies on Resumes by Guest Blogger John Yurkschatt, Recruitment Manager, DCA

Have you ever lied on your resume or embellished the truth when speaking with a recruiter or hiring manager? It happens fairly often and it puzzles me because background checks and references are quite easy to conduct. In addition, a simple Google search can quickly uncover false information.

Recently I caught a candidate in the midst of a lie just by asking the same question twice. The first time I spoke with him, he said he made $80,000 in 2013 and wanted to better himself by changing jobs. When I called back a week later and asked that same question again to make sure that the position I was about to present was in his “must have” range, he bumped his 2013 earnings up to six figures.  All of the sudden, he earned over $100,000 in 2013. I asked to see his W2 for verification purposes but he declined.  He also hung up on me which was for the best since any confidence and trust I placed in him was now gone.

What other things do candidates often embellish or just plain lie about? Here are 5 that my team and I encounter quite often:

Enhancing skill sets & accomplishments. If you didn’t do it, or didn’t achieve it, don’t list it.  However, there’s nothing wrong with enhancing your resume with quantifiable accomplishments and improving how you display them.

Unexplained gaps of employment. Rather than make up a fictional job to cover an employment gap, try acknowledging the gap in your cover letter. If you were taking time off to raise children or to take care of a sick parent, no employer will fault you especially if you can show that you’ve kept up with the industry.

Fabricated education, degrees and certifications.  This is very risky. This lie is one that could not only get you fired, but might also incite legal action on the part of your employer. It’s simply not worth the risk.

Omitting past employment.  Depending on the circumstances or why you left a previous job, you might be tempted to leave it off your application or resume. Carefully weigh your decision, because a background check or employment verification could reveal your omission, making it look as if you are hiding part of your work history.

Falsifying reasons for leaving prior employment. There’s a tactful way of explaining being fired or quitting abruptly, and it doesn’t have to involve lying. Just figure out the best way to explain it in as positive a light as possible. Not explaining the reason(s) can and will ruin your chances of getting hired.

Here’s where I need to reiterate that honesty is still the best policy. Lying on your resume or directly to a recruiter or hiring manager will come back to haunt you. Once you’ve told lies, they snowball.  If you land the job, you’ve got to keep up the charade of each lie for the rest of your career. Who can keep up with all of them?

Have you ever embellished your resume or know somebody who did and got caught? Share your resume stories with us below.

I Found the Perfect Job Online. What do I do Now? By Chris Hesson, Guest Blogger, DRI Plastics Division

BLN469_CHRIS HESSON_C WEBYou’ve found it.

After months of browsing online job boards, you finally see that one role that combines your past roles, industry experience and passion.  And…it’s local!

What do you do now?

This is a scenario many job seekers face.  Unfortunately, most take the worst possible next step: they apply online with the same generic resume they have sent out to so many other companies.

This will most certainly ensure that your resume enters the black hole of corporate HR, never to be seen again!

So, what do you do now?

HINT: Do NOT apply!

Step 1: Customize your resume.

Go through the job description bullet-point by bullet-point.  If they are looking for a software developer with ABC experience, your resume should highlight your experience with ABC.

Your resume should mirror the job description.

Similarly, if you have experiences or skill-sets that are not relevant.  Leave them off or at the least keep them few and simple.

Step 2: Network.

Before you submit a resume online or to HR look through your network.  Do you know anyone that works for the company?  Do you know anyone who knows anyone who works for the company?

Do not be afraid to tap your connections for introductions, no matter where they may be within the organization.

For example: If you are interested in an engineering role, but have a 1st or 2nd connection to someone in finance or sales, reach out to them!  They may go golfing with or park next to the engineering manager

If you have no connections into the company, you can always coldly reach out to someone on the sales team.  Sales professionals are great to network with.

REMEMBER:  Networking is a 2-way street.  Yes you have the goal of being able to make inroads within an organization, but try to find out where you may be able to provide value to them as well.  Networking is all about deposits and withdrawals.  You may even be able to return the favor by providing them with a lead!

Step 3: Repeat Step 2!

Connect with multiple people: develop rapport with them, learn about the company’s philosophy and culture, use them to connect you to other people within the organization.

Step 4: Leverage your network.

Use your old or new-found connections to introduce you to the hiring manager (or worst case – HR), or at the very least pass along your resume, and strongly recommend that they reach out to you.

Step 5: Repeat Step 4!

Having multiple people within an organization championing you increases your chances of having that first conversation with your potential new boss!  A job search is like sales: it is all about pipeline.  (Some people choose to focus on pipeline by sending their resumes out to every company hiring.  But I would recommend honing in on those perfect roles and increasing your pipeline towards them).

Step 6: Talk to a recruiter.

Try to find recruiters who have done business with that company before.  Some recruiters highlight who they work with on their website, or you may see that the hiring authority (or multiple people within the company) is/are connected to several recruiters.  Reach out to them.  Tell them that you are interested in connecting with a company they already know about and a position where they may already know the manager!

At the end of the day, nothing will guarantee you an interview, offer, or even a conversation; but increasing your exposure will decrease the odds that you end up in the resume black hole!