Candidate Emotions to Consider when Making a Hire

July 13, 2016

By Matthew Cohen, Energy & Sustainability Practice Leader

When a hiring manager makes an offer to a candidate, they think about a number of factors such as salary, benefits, start date, counteroffers and a multitude of statistical information to put an offer together for a prospective employee.  In many cases, hiring managers get lost in the numbers when making an offer to a candidate and don’t focus on the emotional side of a job change. Most of us think of a candidate making a job change as simply changing a line item on their resume when in reality any time a candidate makes a job change they are also making a significant life change as well.  This life change brings with it a number of emotions and thoughts to consider when hiring a new employee.

Below are three emotional changes that hiring managers need to consider before making an offer to a candidate:

  1. Relationship with their current employer- It is important to understand their emotional connection with their current company and boss when making an offer to a candidate. Does the candidate have a personal relationship outside of work with their boss or fellow employees? This can be a key factor when a company makes a counteroffer to a candidate.  Often times, the counteroffer can be purely emotional which can be difficult to overcome.
  1. Candidate’s family thoughts- When making a life changing decision, we often look to our families and/or spouses for support and guidance. Asking a candidate what their family thinks about their decision to make a job change is crucial, especially if they respond by saying they have not told their family yet.  This can be a red flag and it should be encouraged to ask a candidate to tell their family of their decision, they may not always be on board.
  1. Revisiting the “Why”- Understanding why a candidate is making a job change is crucial when making an offer to said candidate.  We have established that making a job change is an emotional decision, therefore it is important to understand and underscore what has caused that person to make a change beyond just dollars and cents.  This can help in a counteroffer situation when you can revisit the emotions of why they were interviewing in the first place.

So while candidates express that changing jobs is exciting and challenging all at the same time, it can also be right up there with life’s highest stress factors such as moving, the birth of a child, new marriage, divorce, etc. Understanding the emotions your new hire is going through and helping them make a successful transition will pay off in spades.

Volunteering Can be a Path to a New Job or Career

Volunteer image

By John Yurkschatt, Director of IT, DCA

There are a number of obvious benefits to volunteering including feeling good, giving back, and making a difference in your community.  But volunteering is a great way for you to find a job or new career.  Here’s how it can help:

Volunteers are desirable to employers. Employers like to hire people who can demonstrate that they are committed and hard-working even though they did not get paid for their efforts.

Volunteering can expand your professional network. If you can find a volunteer position within your field, you will have the opportunity to network with people already working in your target field. As you probably already know, networking is the #1 way to land a job these days.

Volunteering lifts your spirits. Taking time to help others increases your sense of usefulness and well-being. It’s keep you healthier as well. In turn, you’ll gain a positive mindset which is extremely critical for finding work.

Volunteering can help hone your skills and offer new ones. If you’re a seasoned professional, you can put your skills to good use.  You can also use this opportunity to develop new skills like project management, time management, leadership, strategic planning, etc.  The organization gets the benefit of your unique abilities and you’ll have a list of new accomplishments to talk about during your next job interview, which might lead to an offer.

Volunteering can fill in employment gaps. If you have suffered from long-term unemployment, volunteering fills the gap on your resume and shows you’re committed to the community. It can also earn you references, which could be key to getting back to work after a long absence.

Volunteering gives you a track record for a cause. Non-profit organizations value their volunteers. If you demonstrate hard work and commitment to their specific cause, they may take notice and hire you. Keep in mind that non-profit organizations are potential employers.

If you found a job through volunteering, let us know your story.

Thank You Notes…Still Protocol When Interviewing by Robert Cohn, Managing Partner & Director of Automation Practice

BLN467_ROBERT COHN_A WEBSo you thought writing a thank you note after an interview wasn’t necessary? Think again.

One of my best clients asked me to take on a challenging search for a sales professional who could meet their qualifications and requirements. My team and I worked diligently on this search and in a short time presented a candidate that piqued their interest.

This candidate went through 2 phone interviews, 1 face-to-face interview and was invited to HQ for a final face-to-face interview. When completed, I was able to debrief both the client and candidate. Both parties shared with me that it was a perfect match and were ready to move to the next level…the job offer.

Several days went by without a word from my client, so I reached out to them and asked if they were ready to close the deal and make an offer to our candidate. What I heard was an emphatic “NO”. The reason was simple…the candidate failed to send a thank you note or email when interviews were concluded. To our client, this showed a lack of gratitude, follow-up and the ability to close the deal…all necessary to be successful in a sales role. In addition, a thank you note would have allowed them to judge his response time and written communication skills.

I called our candidate to ask why he had forgotten this very important step especially since we discussed it as vital part of the interview and post interview process. He didn’t give me a reason as to why he failed to communicate with them but said he would send a note right away. However, it was too late. My client had already decided to start fresh and look at other candidates.

Bottom line, a thank you note or email is still protocol. It’s not old school but respect for a hiring manager’s time and consideration.  In addition, it gives you the opportunity to reiterate your strong interest in the position and answer any questions they may have. It can also set you apart from your competition.

With that, here are some tips to consider when sending your thank you note:

  1. Send your thank you note to every person involved in the interview. Each one should be personalized. Make sure to get a business card or necessary contact information before you leave.
  2.  Nothing beats a hand-written letter, but in this day in age this can be too slow of a response. If you chose to send a thank you note in the mail, send an email as well. Email is perfectly acceptable and is commonly used for thank you notes.
  3. Be sure to send your thank you note or email no later than 24 hours after your interview.
  4. How you write your thank you note makes a difference. Try to make each one original and provide 3-5 sentences thanking them for their time and expressing your enthusiasm. Also, include your contact information should they have questions or want to follow up.

Now I’d like to hear from you. Did writing a thank you note ever separate you from other candidates? Did failing to do so ever prevent you from getting the job?